How to Make a Come Back, Creatively Speaking

Took a bit of a hiatus from the blogosphere and social media which has been liberating. Now that I'm back, I am looking forward to taking a different approach to this creative project. Thus, here is my advice on how to achieve a creative comeback. 

IT'S OKAY TO TAKE A BREAK   

I know I'm guilty of beating myself up for not using time wisely or meeting my goals at a certain time. However, stepping away from our projects, hobbies or passions for a lil bit can actually be more beneficial than not letting go. Its what we do during the time away that will improve our talent and rekindle our zest to create.  If you need a break, just take it and don't feel guilty. 

READ BOOKS

During these past couple of months I've read a few books which is a personal achievement considering that before this break the only language I was deciphering was emojis and rap lyrics. I think its important to especially read topics that are unrelated to your field, because I find that when you learn something completely new, you feel more empowered. For example, I've been reading into starting a business, although I do not plan to start one soon (or do I...) it has helped me reconsider my goals for this blog; creating a community and fully developing this project into a brand like I had planned too since the beginning but never fully committed in achieving. 

However, still do research on topics of your interest, in this case branding and design for creative inspiration. I've been doing extensive research on branding which has gotten me hype enough to finally take the creative direction I can be satisfied with. 

MEET NEW PEOPLE WHO SHARE THE SAME INTEREST OR PASSION AS YOU

Lately, I have been attending events, mostly discussion panels that have been giving me insight on my desired field. Nothing beats the creative energy of a room filled with people that share the same passion as you. Listening too others describe their passions/work is the ultimate motivator to improve your craft. It'll definitely ignite the fire you have. 

If you are a graphic designer and live in a major city, I recommend you check out General Assembly. They host insightful panels with influential people of the industry and workshops/classes at affordable rates. 

BE REAL WITH YOURSELF. DETERMINE YOUR STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESS

You're obviously taking a break because something wasn't quite right. Just recognize what wasn't working for you and determine how you can fix it. But don't be so hard on yourself ( which I'm also guilty of). As a perfectionist, I know the downfall of having a strong eye for detail. After going on a break you might put the pressure on yourself that your work now needs to be the sh**.  However, I've been learning that striving for perfection just leads to unnecessary stress and blocks my creative juices. Just start your creative idea, it might not be the best at first but at least you'll have a starting point to improve on. 

KEEP YOUR PEEPS POSTED

One thing I failed to do, but I strongly advise is keeping your supporters posted on your progress or journey. I know that I should have still been posting on Instagram what I have been up to, with test shots, inspiration, and event footage, but I like to stay mysterious. However, you want people to be excited for your work and progress so its good to give them a little tease once in a while. The support will also be a motivator to create and jump back into the game. 

REINTRODUCE YOURSELF

Now that you have taken a break and have created new work, its time to share. How you share your work matters too. Personally, a new site was the best decision because it allowed me to include more features to expand my idea of creating a community. If you're a photographer/designer you can print some of your images on postcards and leave them at coffee shops or create posters for a giveaway. 

 I hope this advice helps and I wish you the best of luck! If you have a site, blog or dope Instagram leave your link in the comments below. I want to see what you are all up too! 

 

JOURNALAlexandra Castro